Facts about Flat Feet

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At FL Foot Health, we know that the arch of your foot plays a key role in the health of your foot. If your arch is partially or totally collapsed, you have a condition known as flat foot. This is a structural deformity that can cause quite a bit of pain in your feet as well as in your ankles, knees and lower back. Below are some facts about flat feet to help you better understand this podiatric condition.

FACT: Flat foot is a complex disorder that can have multiple symptoms and degrees of disability, as well as different root causes.

FACT: Some causes of flat foot include:

  • Arthritis

  • Heredity

  • Trauma

  • Tight Achilles Tendon

  • Toe drift

  • Heel that tilts outward

FACT: Flat foot can also increase your risk for the development of other conditions such as bunions and hammertoes.

FACT: Although flat foot patients may expect to feel pain in the heel or arch of the foot, there are other potential symptoms as well. These include:

  • Pain in the ankle and outside of the foot

  • Aching or tiredness in the leg or foot

  • Shin bone pain

  • Pain in the knee, hip or lower back

FACT: Your podiatrist will examine your foot if flat foot is suspected and also order x-rays to confirm a diagnosis and determine the severity of the condition. If you do not have a podiatrist currently, our online directory can help you locate a qualified one in your area.

FACT: You may be diagnosed with flat foot and not be in any pain. However, flat foot is a progressive condition. It will not get better without treatment. Early diagnosis can help your podiatrist devise a plan to slow the progression and minimize your discomfort.

FACT: There are several non-invasive treatment options for patients with flat foot. These include:

  • Custom orthotics

  • Losing weight if you are currently overweight or obese.

  • Medications to relieve pain and inflammation.

  • Physical therapy.

  • Modifying activities to avoid long periods of time on your feet.

  • Wearing supportive shoes.

If none of these treatments brings relief, surgery may be necessary.

To learn more about flat foot and other foot and ankle disorders, contact us. Also, consider subscribing to our free e-newsletter which contains much information that can help you keep your feet healthy.